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Old 04-10-2006, 01:36 AM   #36 (permalink)
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Nallatu,

I thought you're a boy from your avatar, but then I checked your profile and saw your photo. Jean Fred is right, interpretation can be wrong.
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Old 04-10-2006, 09:34 AM   #37 (permalink)
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Ladies, I didn't mean to be rude and I'm convinced Chinoise is definitely not a sexist dragon. I reacted to Mikel's humorous post and it dawned on me that we should ban any statement getting in the way of parity.No more Tarzan vs Jane cheetahshit!
Guys are not less gifted, but girls may be more attracted or pushed towards languages. Again, for tradionnal/cultural reasons some matters seem to better fit the so called sensitiveness, or so called superficiality, or so called mundane ability, or so called reserve of women. Women can be bright scientists, high ranking executives, fierce army officers, excellent surgeons, etc....there is still the idea that some jobs are decidedly manly.
Languages may seem more womanly, because their mastering and practice would not involve specific virile qualities.
Am I wrong?
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Old 04-11-2006, 03:19 PM   #38 (permalink)
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We seem to be going just a little far afield of the topic here. We were talking about national resistance to linguistic change through borrowing. Icelandic also provides an interesting example from what I understand, though I don't know much about it.
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Old 09-07-2006, 11:49 PM   #39 (permalink)
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Default Icelandic purism

I just found the weirdest web-page of all time. It is about the extermination of all loan-words in the Icelandic language. If you liked linguistic purism, you're gonna looove this:
<$Blog of the loan-word terminator$>
|| Hafronska -- High Icelandic Language Center ||
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/High_Icelandic
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Old 10-23-2006, 02:56 PM   #40 (permalink)
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Default hmm! a linguistic debate!

i think there must have been a million papers written already on the subject of linguistic purism and whether the alliance française is being silly. of course, both sides have their reasons, but personally, i believe that languages are dynamic and from a sociolinguistic point of view, they are means by which humans communicate, and thus will inevitably fluctuate with time and societal changes.

this is not to say that i don't respect the past, on the contrary, i think that languages NEED to be documented so that we have a sort of "anthropological account" or "history" of language...

i don't believe that a relatively small group of people, such as l'alliance can really do much unless they freeze time...! (am i sparking more controversy? )

the chinese in mainland china have shown what i think is one of the many radical changes in recent history - introducing simplified chinese.

i've also noticed that a lot of the time, writers (i'm using the term broadly to mean all those who write) in mainland china tend to use the male form of 'ta' (他 - literally = 'him') for both males and females, whereas writers in taiwan (not being politically correct here, am i?!) tend to differentiate clearly between the male (他) and female (她) forms when writing (there's no way to differentiate in speech lol).

as i've alluded to in another post, cantonese is very prone to change, probably because it has no standard written form and is mostly a spoken language.
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Old 01-12-2010, 10:26 AM   #41 (permalink)
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I also am interested to see nallatu's comments regarding text messages - English text messages are getting hard to read, and when I try to speak to someone in french online using the french they teach me at school I'm often completely confused by the simplest expressions because the writer is using wrong homonyms or unexplained abbreviations!
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